crime victims rights, domestic violence, Non-Profit Agency, Services Spotlight, Sexual Assualt, Stalking, Victim Service Agency, Violent Crime

AVRC Services Spotlight: Criminal Justice System Advocacy

Recovery from violent crime and/or ongoing abuse can potentially feel overwhelming, especially when trying to juggle one’s daily life on top of navigating the ins and outs of  the criminal justice system.

Who am I supposed to talk to about my concerns regarding my case?

What do I do if I am struggling to make contact with someone?

What are my rights as a victim of violent crime?

What does ‘Arraignment’ mean? 

Sometimes, we just need a helping hand to let us know where to go or what to expect next. As a community based agency, the Arkansas Valley Resource Center (AVRC) stands alongside our local criminal justice system agencies (law enforcement, district attorney, courts, probation, etc,), but also apart from them, allowing AVRC Staff to potentially address the overall needs of the survivor in tandem with their criminal justice case(s) needs.

AVRC can, at the survivor’s request, refer to, arrange contact with, and/or attend contacts with criminal justice agencies, such as meeting with the District Attorney or reporting new and/or ongoing crime to law enforcement. Also, AVRC staff may be available to go with the victim to hearings and trials regarding their victimization, for emotional support. AVRC staff can assist the survivor in completing a victim impact statement or seeking victim compensation to possibly meet financial needs that arise from their victimization. AVRC will educate clients on the Colorado Victim Rights Act (VRA), and can assist when a victim feels their Victims Rights may have been violated, including making a VRA complaint.

If you or someone you know has needs relating to their victimization and the criminal justice system, and is need of support, AVRC staff is available 24/7 to answer your questions!

415 Colorado Avenue, La Junta, CO 81050
(719) 384-7764
TTY: (719) 384-1938
After Hours Colorado Relay dial 711 or 1-800-659-2656

AVRC is non-discriminatory agency regarding race, religion, color, gender, country of national origin, sexual orientation, mental health status, substance use or economic condition.

crime victims rights, domestic violence, Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Intimate Partner Violence, Victim Rights Act, Victim Service Agency, Violent Crime

Domestic Violence in Colorado: Top Facts to Know

Domestic Violence Awareness Month 2018 (#DVAM2018) is in full swing, and the theme for the year is:
AWARENESS + ACTION = SOCIAL CHANGE
With this in mind, here are some facts regarding Domestic Violence in the state of Colorado, to spread awareness about this serious issue and how close to home it may actually be.

  1. Domestic Violence (DV), under the Colorado Revised Statutes (CRS Title 18 Criminal Code § 18-6-8003), is defined as an act or threatened act of violence upon a person whom the actor is or has been involved in an intimate relationship. It further defines “intimate relationship” as a relationship between spouses, former spouses, past or present unmarried couples, or persons who are both the parents of the same child, regardless of whether the persons have been married or have lived together at any time.
  2. DV, per Colorado Law, is a criminal sentence enhancement. This means that if a DV perpetrator is charged and convicted, the sentence of the crime(s) committed (harassment, assault, etc.) increase, due to the potential lethality of the situation.
  3. In Colorado DV cases, if law enforcement has probable cause to believe that DV has occurred, the perpetrator is to be automatically arrested. Additionally, the perpetrator is to be held without bond until he goes before a Judge for advisement, and a mandatory (criminal) no-contact protection order is issued.
  4. Colorado DV cases cannot be dropped by the victim in the case. It is at the discretion of the State, specifically the prosecuting District Attorney’s Office, to “drop charges”.
  5. Per the Colorado Victim Rights Act (VRA), Domestic Violence is considered a violent crime. As such, victims of DV are to be protected throughout duration of the criminal justice process under the Colorado VRA.
  6. As a VRA protected crime, the victim of a DV case that has been reported and charged may be able to access Victims Compensation to pay for expenses that may have been a result of their victimization.
  7. Of the crimes against persons reported to the Colorado Bureau of Investigation (CBI) in 2017, 18,239 were committed by a current or previous intimate partner of the victim; in 2016, these reports totaled 17,423.
  8. From 2013 to 2017, CBI has reported a total of 129 murders committed by former or current intimate partners of the victim. Of these, 2 were reported within the 16th Judicial District (Bent, Crowley, and Otero counties).
  9. The Arkansas Valley Resource Center was created, in 1987, in response to a DV murder that occurred in the 16th Judicial District (Bent, Otero, and Crowley Counties).


If you, a friend, or a family member are a victim of Domestic Violence, and you are in need of support, AVRC Staff are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Your contacts are confidential/privileged and at no cost to you. Reach out today!

415 Colorado Avenue, La Junta, CO 81050
24 Hour Hotline: (719) 384-7764
TTY: (719) 384-1938
After Hours Colorado Relay dial 711 or 1-800-659-2656

 

AVRC is non-discriminatory agency regarding race, religion, color, gender, country of national origin, sexual orientation, mental health status, substance use or economic condition.

domestic violence, Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Non-Profit Agency, Victim Service Agency, Violent Crime

October is Domest Violence Awareness Month (#DVAM)

Starting October 1st, Domestic Violence Awareness Month started across the country. Beginning in 1987, #DVAM has celebrated over 30 years of hope, education, and advocacy. This year, the Domestic Violence Awareness Project has started a campaign geared toward the overall goal of social change. 

Awareness_Action_Social_Change

 

Awareness is the key to understanding how we can take Action against Domestic Violence, so that Change can truly take hold! All it takes is #1thing to start making a difference today!

Stay tuned for more #DVAM topics throughout the month of October!

 

415 Colorado Avenue, La Junta, CO 81050
24 Hour Hotline: (719) 384-7764
TTY: (719) 384-1938
After Hours Colorado Relay dial 711 or 1-800-659-2656

 

AVRC is non-discriminatory agency regarding race, religion, color, gender, country of national origin, sexual orientation, mental health status, substance use or economic condition.

 

Abuse in Focus, crime victims rights, domestic violence, Elder Abuse, Victim Service Agency, Violent Crime

Abuse in Focus: Financial Abuse

Financial abuse, also known as economic abuse, is a pattern of abuse that can be very common, but seems to be infrequently discussed or publicized. Most typically, financial abuse appears to be associated with elder abuse, but has also been found to occur in domestically violent relationships, as well as with at-risk adults. With domestic violence (DV), 99% of cases identified some form of financial abuse. When examining elder abuse, financial abuse occurred in upwards of 16% of cases, according to the National Center on Elder Abuse.

So what is financial abuse? In general terms, it is financial-based control and/or exploitation of a victim. This is a control over finances and other assets, whether the money is a joint fund or the victim’s own income. In the context of  elder abuse, the National Council on Aging defines financial abuse (financial exploitation) as “the misuse or withholding of an older adult’s resource by another, which can be identified by a sudden change in the victim’s financial situation. Financial exploitation can also occur with at-risk adults who aren’t necessarily elderly. In some instances, the victim may request that a 3rd party manage their income for them, and that 3rd party either takes that income for themselves, or won’t allow the victim to access their assets, as a means to control the victim. Other types of financial exploitation of elders and at-risk adults can be the perpetrator naming themselves as a benefactor or changing other legal financial documents without consent from the victim. These behaviors can also occur with DV, as well.

SchroederUSNews_600

In DV cases, financial/economic abuse can take on many forms, committed with the goal of limiting a victim’s access to economic resources. Financial abuse can make it potentially more difficult to leave the abusive relationship, as the victim may not have the resources to seek legal aid, obtain their own home away from their abuser, or maintain the bills in their current home.

Financial+Abuse

 As with every abusive behavior, control is the overall goal. These patterns may limit the victim’s ability to meet their basic needs, and can make them less confident about reporting or leaving the abusive situation. With support, a victim may access the resources and tools to regain control over their life. Should you, a friend, or family member be a victim of financial abuse, don’t hesitate to reach out, because support is available. If you would like to know more about financial abuse, or are seeking resources to potentially stop or recover from financial abuse, AVRC staff is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

415 Colorado Avenue, La Junta, CO 81050
24 Hour Hotline: (719) 384-7764
TTY: (719) 384-1938
After Hours Colorado Relay dial 711 or 1-800-659-2656

 

DV financial abuse information provided by:
The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
https://ncadv.org/blog/posts/quick-guide-economic-and-financial-abuse
&
The National Network to End Domestic Violence
https://nnedv.org/content/about-financial-abuse/

Elder financial abuse/exploitation information provided by:
The National Center on Elder Abuse
https://ncea.acl.gov/
&
The National Council on Aging
https://www.ncoa.org/public-policy-action/elder-justice/elder-abuse-facts/

 

AVRC is non-discriminatory agency regarding race, religion, color, gender, country of national origin, sexual orientation, mental health status, substance use or economic condition.